Beware of Invisible Cows (Kodak Blog, February 2008)

NOTE: This is a “reprint” of my blog post to Kodak’s previous “A Thousand Words” blog.

I have to admit that I have lots of pictures of signs in my photo collection. Signs are great visual reminders of where I’ve been, what I’ve seen and what I’ve learned, especially when traveling or on vacation. They can also help tell the story about a trip. Instead of needing to provide a caption for places I’ve seen, I can simply use a picture of a sign.

That’s nice, but what does this have to do with “invisible cows” you ask? Well, amidst all of the informative pictures of signs in my photo collection, I also happen to have a few of some funny, entertaining and unique signs. Here are a few examples:

Mauna Kea Sign

On the Big Island of Hawaii, many visitors go up Mauna Kea for some amazing star gazing at night. Apparently dark roads and dark cows can be a dangerous combination, as this entertaining warning sign indicates.

Extreme Danger Sign

 

Another popular place to visit on the Big Island of Hawaii is the Hawaii Volcanoes National Park. You can hike across hardened lava flows, but you do so at your own risk. I wonder if the damage to this sign makes it more effective as a warning sign?

 

 

Wailea Sign

In Wailea in Maui, there’s a path near the ocean where you can find this sign warning you to “Stay on Path.” I like the visual icons used to depict the potential dangers.

Sometimes it’s surprising to find what different types of information can be combined and provided in a single sign. Here’s an example from Oswego, Illinois, where you can thank Jesus, get the price of milk and find out that Cooper is graduating all in a single glance from the road:

Thank You Milk Congrats Sign

 

Looking for food, treasures, souvenirs, or perhaps marriage consultation? This sign at the Meiji Temple in Japan can show you the way.

Meiji Shrine Sign

 

What about you? Do you have some interesting pictures of signs in your photo collection? Tell us about them in the comments.

Posted in kodak_blog, photography, travel.

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